Seeing the World Through a Dog’s Eyes

by | Oct 3, 2023

Are dogs colour blind?

To put it simply, a dog’s colour vision is similar to that of a human who is red-green colour blind. They can differentiate between various shades of blue and yellow but struggle to perceive and distinguish between reds and greens.

Despite this limited colour vision, dogs have other visual advantages, such as superior motion detection and low-light vision. Their ability to detect subtle movements and see well in dim light makes them excellent hunters and trackers.

It’s important to keep a dog’s colour vision limitations in mind when designing toys or training aids. Using toys that contrast in shades of blue and yellow can make them more visible and appealing to dogs. However, dogs rely heavily on their keen sense of smell and other sensory abilities, such as hearing, to navigate and interact with their environment.

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